PHOTOS: Sikh Community of Colorado third annual “Nagar Kirtan” parade

The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado “Nagar Kirtan” Sikh Parade on Aug. 30, 2022, in Denver. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade.

  • Davinder Bopari holds the Chaur Sahib, a ceremonial whisk, over the Guru Granth Sahib, to reverently fan the scripture to protect it during the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. TheÊGuru Granth Sahib is the central holy religious scripture ofÊSikhism.The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Partap Mann rides Sentenario, an Andalusian horse, as he takes part in the Nagar Kirtan parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Women pray at the end of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Avriaj Sandhu, 7, wears a ÒSikhs Love America shirtÓ as he holds a flag while taking part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Jasnoor Kaur takes part in prayer during ceremonies to start the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Jasnoor Kaur takes part in prayer during ceremonies to start the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare, or the Beloved Five, hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as take part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on August 28, 2022 in Denver, Colorado. They are from left to right: Harcharan Singh, Hazvra Singh, Kirpal Singh, Jatinder Singh, and Amrit Singh, right. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Avriaj Sandhu, 7, wears a ÒSikhs Love America shirtÓ as he holds a flag while taking part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as take part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on August 28, 2022 in Denver, Colorado. They are from left to right: Harcharan Singh, Hazvra Singh, Karanjeet Singh, holding the flag, Jatinder Singh, and Amrit Singh, right. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Jasnoor Kaur takes part in prayer during ceremonies to start the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Davinder Bopari uses the Chaur Sahib, a ceremonial whisk to reverently fan the Guru Granth Sahib scripture as they move down Colfax Ave during the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. TheÊGuru Granth Sahib is the central holy religious scripture ofÊSikhism.The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare holding kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, help escort the the Guru Granth Sahib out of the building after taking part prayer before the start of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. . TheÊGuru Granth Sahib is the central holy religious scripture ofÊSikhism. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as they take part prayer before the start of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • A woman holds her hands up in prayer during ceremonies to start the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • A woman holds her hands up in prayer during ceremonies to start the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Avriaj Sandhu, 7, wears a ÒSikhs Love America shirtÓ as he holds a flag while taking part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Davinder Bopari, seated, holds up the Guru Granth Sahib during prayer before the start of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. TheÊGuru Granth Sahib is the central holy religious scripture ofÊSikhism. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Harsahib Singh, second from right, plays a large Nagara drum with other members of the Sikh community as they take part in the Nagar Kirtan parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare, or the Beloved Five, hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as take part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on August 28, 2022 in Denver, Colorado. They are from left to right: Harcharan Singh, Hazvra Singh, Kirpal Singh, Jatinder Singh, and Amrit Singh, second from right. Flag bearer Karanjeet Singh is at right. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as they take part prayer before the start of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Partap Mann rides Sentenario, an Andalusian horse, as he takes part in the Nagar Kirtan parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Karanjeet Singh, right, holding the flag, leads the Panj Pyare, who hold their kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, down Colfax Avenue as they take part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on August 28, 2022 in Denver, Colorado. The Pan Pyare are from left to right: Hazvra Singh,Kirpal Singh, and Jatinder Singh, second from right. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Woman pray and watch as Davinder Bopari prays over the Guru Granth Sahib at the end of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. TheÊGuru Granth Sahib is the central holy religious scripture ofÊSikhism.The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Partap Mann rides Sentenario, an Andalusian horse, as he takes part in the Nagar Kirtan parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Women pray at the end of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as they take part prayer at the end of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Partap Mann rides Sentenario, an Andalusian horse, as he takes part in the Nagar Kirtan parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Women gather together to take part in prayer during ceremonies to start the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • The Panj Pyare hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as take part prayer before the start of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Parvinder Singh, center, plays a large Nagara drum with other members of the Sikh community as they take part in the Nagar Kirtan parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Bhoopender Singh, left, puts a turban on the head of Avjot Bajwa, 4, before taking part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Panj Pyare, in front, hold kirpans, or curved, single-edged daggers, as they watch Davinder Bopari wave the Chaur Sahib, a ceremonial whisk, high over the Guru Granth Sahib, to reverently fan the scripture at the beginning of the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. TheÊGuru Granth Sahib is the central holy religious scripture ofÊSikhism.The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

  • Bhoopender Singh, left, puts a turban on the head of Avjot Bajwa, 4, before taking part in the Nagar Kirtan Sikh Parade on Aug. 28, 2022 in Denver. The Sikh Community of Colorado held its third annual Colorado ÒNagar KirtanÓ Sikh Parade. Festivities were held at East High School and the parade proceeded down Colfax Avenue covering 4 miles winding among Capitol Hill neighborhoods to end back at East High School. The program included Kirtan (spiritual music) and the colorful parade. In addition to the program, free vegetarian food (Langar) was served all day long to attendees. Organizers expected to serve over 10,000 free meals to attendees over the course of the day. Organizers hoped the event would be an educational opportunity for the Colorado community to better understand the Sikh culture and its people. Sikhs own over a thousand businesses in Colorado and employ tens of thousands of individuals. Their faith believes in equality of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, and striving for social justice for all. Although they are a peace loving religion, Sikhs are often victims of hate crimes in the United States. The FBI has documented a rising tide of hate in America since first releasing data on bias incidents in 2015. This data consistently shows that Sikhs are among the nation's top five most-targeted religious groups. The group estimates that Sikhs are hundreds of times more likely than their fellow Americans to experience hate crimes and bias incidents because of their distinct appearance. The parade route started at East High School on E. 16th Esplanade Place and headed south down to E. Colfax Avenue. The Sikh religion began with its first teacher, Guru Nanak, in the late 1400's. Guru Nanak taught that a Divine Creator was at the heart of every religion and that people could live together in love no matter what their faith or cultural background. He brought people together through songs and prayers. Ê (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

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