Im still waiting to know! Emmanuel Macrons wife breaks silence on elections

Emmanuel Macron's wife Brigitte addresses French 2022 elections

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The news comes as the incumbent has yet to officially announce he will be running for a second term in April. Although the eventual announcement is almost an inevitability, the late announcement of his running has caused some speculation in France. Speaking on French media outlet, TF1, the first lady was asked about the potential candidacy of her husband for the 2022 presidential election.

She assured viewers that she is not trying to influence his decision and that for the time being she remains “resolutely in the present”.

The 68 year-old said: “Like you, I am waiting for his decision.”

Invited on TF1’s 13H (a popular lunchtime news show) for the launch of the Pièces Jaunes operation that she orchestrates as president of the Hospitals Foundation, Mrs Macron also mentioned the potential candidacy of the Head of State… without revealing anything about his intentions.

On 4 January, Mr Macron told Le Parisien that he “wanted” to run in the 2022 presidential election, without confirming that he would be a candidate for the time being. “Like you, I am waiting for his decision,” said his wife.

Mrs Macron also said she did not interfere in her husband’s decision.

She said: “I want to say that in no way, shape or form do I try to influence him, to convince, to persuade, never,

“Because this is a matter between the French and a man or a woman, and I have absolutely no business intervening. I forbid myself.”

She added: “In my head, it’s five years, so I’m scheduled for five years,

“After that, I’ll see. Life has been extremely inventive with me. And for the past 25 years, it has been inventive every day.”

The first lady also said: “When you are married to a man like Emmanuel Macron, I can tell you that every day has its share of surprises.” Before insisting all the same: “Nothing exists but the present, I am resolutely in the present”.

Speaking of his intentions on the issue last December, Mr Macron said: “This decision is consolidated in my heart. I need to be sure that I am able to go as far as I want to.”

The President added: “If I speak today, what will be my capacity to manage the peak of the health crisis?”

Assuming a decision that would therefore come “sooner rather than later, given the calendar”, the head of state therefore postponed a possible declaration “as soon as health conditions allow it”.

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For Emmanuel Macron, in practice, there is no rush.

For the time being, he is not required to declare himself a candidate and can postpone this announcement until a rather late date.

If those close to some of the contenders for his succession are busy convincing mayors behind the scenes, it should be noted that the collection of sponsorships begins “with the publication of the decree convening the voters”, says the Vie Publique website.

Already, the campaigns and announcements of Mr Macron’s major competition for the top job have started.

Marine Le Pen, Eric Zemmour and Valérie Pécresse have all starting proceedings.

With the far-right split between Ms Len Pen and Mr Zemmour, many suggest Valerie Pecresse poses the greatest threat to Mr Macron.

According to an IFOP poll released on Wednesday, President Macron would come out on top of the first round with 27 percent of the vote.

Valérie Pécresse of the mainstream right-wing party Les Republicains (LR) and Ms Le Pen would each secure 16.5 percent of the vote while Zemmour is projected to claim 13.5 percent of ballots.

According to the Political Barometre from the INSEAD business school, Mr Zemmour was the most-searched-for candidate on Google in December, accounting for nearly 39 percent of all searches, ahead of Macron’s 29.2 percent.

Marine Le Pen came in fifth behind Ms Pécresse and former-protégé-turned-rival Florian Philippot.

Additional reporting by Maria Ortega

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